Saturday, January 23, 2016

Foodie



In this richly penetrating documentary odyssey, Pulitzer Prize-winning food critic Jonathan Gold shows us a Los Angeles where ethnic cooking is a kaleidoscopic portal to the mysteries of an unwieldy city and the soul of America. Combing through colorful neighborhoods in his green pickup truck, Gold is sniffing out his next strip-mall discovery—whether Oaxacan grasshopper soup, hand-cut tonkotsu ramen, or a particularly unctuous pad see ew. As piping-hot platters are served up, so are stories of immigrants whose secret family recipes are like sacred offerings pledged for the opportunity to build their American Dream. With eternal curiosity, razor-sharp intellect, and existential longing, Gold is a culinary geographer taking us where no critic has gone before.
This movie isn't out in theatres in the States until March 11, but I stumbled on it free via Amazon Prime yesterday. Well worth a look.

While I have got my Amazon foodie head on, the Hang Fire girls' (though they don't like to be called that) book is now available for pre-order.

Barbecue is a serious business. And for anyone who thought barbecue was about big, bearded blokes toiling over hot coals, think again: the Hang Fire girls are the real experts.In 2012 Sam and Shauna ditched their jobs and embarked on a 6-month road trip around the best barbecue joints in the southern United States. From Texas to Tallahassee, they learned the insider secrets of what makes barbecue great, were captivated by the thrill of smoke and fire, and back home in Cardiff they set out their meat manifesto in the form of Hang Fire Smokehouse.Now they sell out week after week from their street-food stall as customers flock to Hang Fire for stunning dishes including smoked brisket, ultimate pork 'n' slaw and tailgate hot-wings. This cookbook reveals how they make their delicious recipes and the secrets behind the perfect smoke and BBQ. Sam and Shauna explain the basics of getting started with a home smoker and different types of wood, and what rubs, cures and brines work best with certain types of meat. Hang Fire's approach is simple: get the best ingredients, cook them low 'n' slow, and tuck in.
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