Thursday, February 26, 2015

'Oh wow. Oh wow. Oh wow'

LRB
In 1996, in response to the 1992 Russo-American moratorium on nuclear testing, the US government started a programme called the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative. The suspension of testing had created a need to be able to run complex computer simulations of how old weapons were ageing, for safety reasons, and also – it’s a dangerous world out there! – to design new weapons without breaching the terms of the moratorium. To do that, ASCI needed more computing power than could be delivered by any existing machine. Its response was to commission a computer called ASCI Red, designed to be the first supercomputer to process more than one teraflop. A ‘flop’ is a floating point operation, i.e. a calculation involving numbers which include decimal points (these are computationally much more demanding than calculations involving binary ones and zeros). A teraflop is a trillion such calculations per second. Once Red was up and running at full speed, by 1997, it really was a specimen. Its power was such that it could process 1.8 teraflops. That’s 18 followed by 11 zeros. Red continued to be the most powerful supercomputer in the world until about the end of 2000.
I was playing on Red only yesterday – I wasn’t really, but I did have a go on a machine that can process 1.8 teraflops. This Red equivalent is called the PS3: it was launched by Sony in 2005 and went on sale in 2006. Red was only a little smaller than a tennis court, used as much electricity as eight hundred houses, and cost $55 million. The PS3 fits underneath a television, runs off a normal power socket, and you can buy one for under two hundred quid. Within a decade, a computer able to process 1.8 teraflops went from being something that could only be made by the world’s richest government for purposes at the furthest reaches of computational possibility, to something a teenager could reasonably expect to find under the Christmas tree.
The Raspberry Pi is a credit card-sized computer that sells for about thirty quid. We have got one in the office (see Icons passim).

Earlier this month the Raspberry Pi Foundation announced the retail availability of their new board, the Raspberry Pi 2; a vastly improved spec for the same price, and on the same day Microsoft announced that they would support it with a free version of Windows 10.

Windows RT was a flop and the Pi is powered by ARM not Intel, but this does offer the promise of a £30 PC later this year when the next version of Windows comes out.

(Disclaimer: as of this morning our shares in ARM had gone up 245% since we bought them.)
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